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Alpine A106

Alpine A106 (France, 1955-1961)

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History, Development and General Characteristics

The Renault-Alpine A106 was the first of all creations from the rally driver Jean Redelé, who was also the founder and owner of Renault’s subsidiary brand Alpine, with power plant in Dieppe, France.

This 2-seater sports coupe was launched in 1955 symbolizing the beginning of the Renault-Alpine partnership. It marked as well the styling roots for all subsequent Renault-Alpine models.

The A106 would be replaced by its successor A108 until 1961, when 251 units had been manufactured.



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Engine and Transmission

The A106 was launched with a 747cc rear engine, to which were later added the 845 cc, 904 cc and 998 cc options. The first A106 cars were available with 21 hp or 38 hp. Then, the larger engines that were added increased the car’s maximum power to 59 hp.

The rear-wheel driven car achieved its top speed between 75 mi/h (120 km/h) and 115 mi/h (185 km/h).

The A106 offered the chance to choose its transmission system between the original 3-speed gearbox and a newer 5-speed version.



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Chassis

Tubular-framed backbone chassis. 

Steering Rack-and-pinion.  

Brakes Rear wheels handbrake and pedal-run four-wheel disc brakes.



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Body and Design

Michelotti conceived the 2-seater sports coupe that would turn out to be the A106. The car’s body was mainly built in fibreglass and placed on a Renault 4CV floor pan.

The styling for A106 resulted from Jean Redelé’s idea of building an aerodynamic polyester body and adjust it with the 4CV’s chassis. The result is a curved and sleek bodywork, with a rather slim front end and a short, leaning rear.



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Motorsport

After the World War II, France re-started competing on international rally events with the Alpine A106.

In 1955, Jean Redelé drove one A106 at the Mille Miglia race, winning on its category, which gave the car the nickname for which it became known as, “Mille Miles”.



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