Dream Garage: give as gift

Eight
Give this car to your buddy
Eight


choose buddy

close
Dream Garage: buy car

This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
Dream Garage: give car

This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
Make this version your fan

This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
Eight

Eight (United Kingdom, 1934)

close
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
add section
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
About

It has been said many a time that most pre-war 8hp cars were either inspired by Ford's 1932 Y-series, with the Singer Nine and Morris Eight in particular appearing to share a fair amount of its DNA.

This may or may not be so, but it is arguably the Morris Eight that  stands above all other contemporaries as the definitive 1930's small car. Indeed, it was to become the company's saviour from potential bankrupcy. Head along to any vintage car rally in Britain or one of its major export markets, and chances are that the pre-war small car attendance will be dominated by the little "Morrie".

Like the bodywork, the Morris 8 mechanicals mirrored those of the Ford Y to a significant degree, yet were improved in specification. A 918cc side-valve, three-bearing engine was mated to a three-speed gearbox, electrics were six volt, and "Magma" wire spoked wheels were fitted up until the arrival of the Series II at the end of 1937. There were both two-door and four-door saloons, as well as a two-seater and a four-seater tourer, which featured Harvey-Spicer universals instead of fabric joints.



back to toptop
Pre-Series, Series I + II

First out of the box in late 1934 was what is now referred to as the Pre-Series model, which ran for only a few months until the Series I was released midway through 1935. Guards were painted black, with two-tone bodies. This early shape had its final year in 1938 as the Series II, when the familiar black radiator shell with central horizontal chrome bar gave way to a more complex painted unit, modelled after that on the larger Morris Ten. Steel, 'easi-clean' wheels were introduced at that time. Although black guards remained a Morris Eight signature, the bodies were now offered in one single colour, usually dark blue, dark green, or maroon.
 



back to toptop
E-Series

The final iteration of the Eight came towards the end of 1938, when the new "E-series" was announced. Although the mechanicals were largely unchanged (aside from a cylinder head upgrade and a four-speed gearbox), the E-series body was a radical transformation, featuring built-in headlamps, a modern 'waterfall' radiator grille ahead of a rear-hinged bonnet, six-light cabin, and a protruding boot where previously there was only a spare wheel affixation.



back to toptop
After 1945

Although World War II halted production from late 1939, the Eight returned in 1945 though without the tourer versions, and remained in production until the new, Issigonis-designed Morris Minor arrived toward the end of 1948. Although the Minor saw the end of the Morris Eight, 5cwt van and pickup versions - the Z-series commercials - continued in production until 1953.



back to toptop
Production

Pre-Series: (see Series I)
Series I: 164,100
Series II: 54,000
E-Series: 54,134 pre-war, 60,000 post-war



back to toptop
you might want to read about:
Eight


It has been said many a time that most pre-war 8hp cars were either inspired by Ford's 1932 Y-series, with the Singer Nine and Morris Eight in particular appearing to share a fair amount of its DNA. This may or may not be so, but it is arguably the Morris Eight that stands above all other contemporaries as the definitive 1930's small car. Indeed, it was to become the company's saviour from potential bankrupcy. Head along to any vintage car rally in Britain or one of its major export markets...  more
close