Make this model your fan

This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
GM EN-V

GM EN-V (United States of America, 2010)

close
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
contents:

Review


add section
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
Review

GM and its strategic partner, Shangai Automotive Industry Corp. Group presented at the World Expo 2010 Shanghai the EN-V concept, a two-seat electric vehicle conceived taking in consideration the reduction of traffic congestion, parking availability, air quality and affordability for the cities of the future.

EN-V is a short name for Electric Networked-Vehicle and was developed based on the the Personal Urban Mobility and Accessibility (P.U.M.A.) prototype by Segway.

Three different versions of the EN-V were created to feature at the SAIC-GM Pavilion at World Expo 2010 Shanghai. Each version represented a characteristic that emphasizes the enjoyable nature of future transportation: Jiao (Pride), Miao (Magic) and Xiao (Laugh).

The concept vehicle is powered by two electric motors placed in each of its driving-mode wheels. The EN-V has the ability to carry two passengers and light cargo thanks to the dynamic stabilization technology with which it has been fitted and to be driven autonomously or under manual control.

The EN-V has its power provided by lithium-ion batteries that produce zero CO2 emissions that can be recharged in a conventional wall outlet using standard household power. It allows the concept car to drive for at least 40 km on a single charge, at a maximum speed of 40km/h.

GM and SAIC’s concept weights less than 500 kilograms and is 1.5 meters long. The body and canopy of the EN-V are built from carbon fiber, custom-tinted Lexan and acrylic, materials that are more commonly used in race cars, military airplanes and spacecraft because of their strength and lightweight characteristics.



back to toptop
close