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Citroën DS5

Citroën DS5 (France, 2011-present)

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Review


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Review

Citroen has lifted the curtain off its DS5 model at the 2011 Shanghai Auto Show. It has been revealed that the DS5 is the French manufacturer’s first vehicle to feature a hybrid diesel powertrain.

The Hybrid4 system gives the DS5 a power output of 200 hp for all four of its wheels, along with electric power for emission-free driving. Also included is an ‘acceleration boost function for the open road’. Total CO2 emissions will amount to 99g/km.

The innovative vehicle design of the DS5 features what Citroen call ‘pioneering architecture’ with a compact body (4.52m long, 1.85m wide), the driving position of a GT car, a sport wagon’s boot (465 litres) and the access and modularity of a hatchback. The car is aimed at the executive segment, particularly customers ‘looking for a truly bold and assertive car with a resolutely modern approach to vehicle design.’

The DS5’s flowing exterior is full of sleek lines with bold wheel arches housing alloys available from 16 inches to 19 inches. The distinctive DS front-end seats chrome ‘sabre’ inserts which stretch from the headlamps to the windscreen while the wide rear-end contains twin tail pipes and six light guides. 

 



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Citroën


André Citroën had already been involved in the automotive industry for many years, where he produced gears. While the First World War was taking place, André Citroën was producing munitions and armaments for France. Once the conflict was over, Citroën was left with an "unworthy" factory, given that he no longer needed to produce those equipments. He then turned his factory into ...  more

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