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Citroën C5

Citroën C5 (France, 2000-present)

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Review


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Review

The C5 is a 5-door large family car produced since 2001. The first generation C5 was sold as five-door liftback and station wagon versions. The engine range offered 1.8 and 2.0-litre straight-4 and 3.0-litre V6 petrol engines as well as 1.6, 2.0 and 2.2-litre direct injection diesel engines. In 2004, the vehicle received a facelift with new front and rear designs, similar to the new C4. Both body versions were lengthened, the liftback from 4,618 mm to 4,745 mm and the station wagon from 4,755 mm to 4,840 mm. In 2007 the second generation C5 was introduced, dropping the liftback body style version. In 2008 an estate version was launched under the Tourer badge.

The second generation was offered with the same 2.7L Ford AJD-V6/PSA DT17 engine as the Citroën C6. In 2009 the 2.7L was updated to a 3.0L engine. In 2010 a new 2.0L HDi 160 engine with 6 speed automatic or manual transmissions was introduced and the 2.0L 16V 143 bhp petrol engine was substituted by the 1.6L THP 155 used in the DS3 with six speed manual transmission. In 2011, the C5 received a small facelift with just cosmetic changes such as LED lights and three engines, two diesels - 2.0 HDI 140, a 2.2 HDI 200 and a 1.6 VTI 120 petrol engine.


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Citroën


André Citroën had already been involved in the automotive industry for many years, where he produced gears. While the First World War was taking place, André Citroën was producing munitions and armaments for France. Once the conflict was over, Citroën was left with an "unworthy" factory, given that he no longer needed to produce those equipments. He then turned his factory into ...  more

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