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Citroën C1

Citroën C1 (France, 2014-present)

Citroën > C1 > Gen.2
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Review


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Review

The Citroën C1 is clearly a city car and that is also clear in its reduced dimensions. The second generation unveiled at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show is 3.46m long, 1.62m wide and has turning circle of 4.8m. The model receives a more striking design with LED daytime lights and rear headlamps with 3D effect being added.

Citroën invested in the model's personalization and so the C1 is available in eight exterior colors, plus a pair of two-tone combinations at the time of launch. Inside the model receives strong colored trim and also colorful details in the door panels. The C1 also gets a 7-inch touch screen that can be connected to the driver's smartphone. Other equipment options include climate control, heated seats and a reversing camera.

In terms of engines the new Citroën C1 is available in three different options. The version with the three-cylinder engine 1.2-liter e-VTi 68 Airdream of 68hp was combined with a manual five-speed gearbox and receives a special aerodynamics package. The same engine can also be combined with a manual five-speed gearbox Efficient Tronic Gearbox for better driving. The engine from the Puretech family, the three-cylinder 1.2 VTi with 82hp completes the enginerange of the new C1. This version has an average fuel consumption of 4.3l/100km and CO2 emissions of 99g/km.



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Citroën


André Citroën had already been involved in the automotive industry for many years, where he produced gears. While the First World War was taking place, André Citroën was producing munitions and armaments for France. Once the conflict was over, Citroën was left with an "unworthy" factory, given that he no longer needed to produce those equipments. He then turned his factory into ...  more

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