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Chevrolet Corvette

Chevrolet Corvette (United States of America, 1968-1982)

Chevrolet > Corvette > Gen.3 [C3]
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History and Development

The Chevrolet Corvette C3 was the longest lived generation of the Corvette so far, with 14 years of production – from 1968 to 1982. Since 1969, this model was also called “Stingray” (following the C2’s nickname Sting Ray), at least until 1976.   In 1978, Chevrolet launched a 25th birthday ‘Silver Anniversary’ edition of the Corvette.



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Engine and Transmission

The Corvette Stingray was released with a 5.7-liter V8 front engine, which was enlarged to 7.4 liters in 1970. The 7.4-liter engine initially put out 370 hp and in 1971 it produced 425 hp. In 1975, power was lowered and the Corvette was offered with 165 hp and 205 hp options. Then, from 1982, only a 200 hp engine was offered.   The Stingray runs on a rear-wheel drive powertrain with a 4-speed manual transmission.



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Chassis

Steel network frame.   Platform
  Suspension Front short arms with coil springs and shock absorbers; rear independant triple-link arms with transverse leaf spring and lateral link.   Steering Unassisted Recirculating Ball steering system.   Brakes Four-wheel upgraded discs with special proportioning valve.



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Body and Design

The Corvette Stingray was offered in 2-door coupe and 2-door convertible body styles, although the last convertible Stingray was made in 1975.



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