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BMW 7 Series

BMW 7 Series (Germany, 2009-present)

BMW > 7 Series > Gen.5 [F01 / F02]
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About

On January 2009 the 5th generation of the 7 Series (F01/F02) debuted. The new generation introduced into BMW's line-up the ZF 8-speed automatic transmission. Five versions of the generation were showcased at its debut, the 750Li, the 740Li, the 750i, the 740i and the 730d.



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Design

A harmonious combination of elegance and sportiness is the key issue in the body design of the fifth generation of the BMW 7 Series. Over and above the long wheelbase, the long and stretched-out engine compartment lid and the short body overhang at the front, the passenger compartment moved relatively far to the rear and the low and sleek roofl ine characterise the dynamic proportions of the latest BMW 7 Series.

The BMW kidney grille stands out far to the front and is fully integrated in the front end without anyvisible joints or seams, emphasising the powerful presence of the car. The bottom air intake stretches across the entire front air dam, thus highlighting, together with the foglamps and the chrome band above the air intake, the signifi cant width of the car and its powerful stance on the road.

The sporting and elegant side view of the car is further highlighted by the long wheelbase: the new BMW 7 Series comes with the longest wheelbase in the luxury saloon segment, both in its “regular” guise (3,070 millimetres/ 120.9'') and in the extended-wheelbase version (3,210 millimetres/126.4''). In both cases this means extra space within the interior and a signifi cant enhancement of motoring comfort, particularly since the wheelbase of the BMW 750Li and the BMW 740Li extended by 14 centimetres or 5.5'' completely benefi ts the passengers’ legroom at the rear.



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Engines and Transmissions

The BMW 7 Series features the world’s most efficient V8 petrol engine, the most powerful straight-six within BMW’s line-up of power units, and the first representative of a new generation of straight-six diesels.

The three engines stand out through dynamic power and performance, supreme motoring culture, and unique efficiency. In their respective power and performance segments they therefore offer an incomparably good balance of power and economy all in one. The engines thus comply in full with the BMW Effi cientDynamics development strategy featuring a wide range of further innovations in the new BMW 7 Series.

730d

This enhancement of efficiency comes out particularly in the BMW 730d. Offering average fuel consumption of just 7.2 litres/100 kilometres (equal to 39.2 mpg imp) in the EU test cycle, this is the most economical car in its entire segment, with a standard of all-round fuel efficiency made possible by the first generation of straight-six diesel engines.

The new diesel engine displacing 3.0 litres develops maximum output of 180 kW/245 hp at an engine speed of 4,000 rpm. Maximum torque of 540 Newton-metres or 398 lb-ft, in turn, comes at just 1,750 rpm.  The car is able to accelerate to 100 km/h in just 7.2 seconds and reacha top speed of 245 km/h (152 mph).

750i

Displacing 4.4 litres, the eight-cylinder power unit featured in the new BMW 750i is the fi rst petrol engine of its kind worldwide to feature the turbochargers in the V-section between the two rows of cylinders. In addition to the optimisation of weight provided by the aluminium crankcase, this confi guration also makes the engine extremely compact in its dimensions.

The V8 develops maximum output of 300 kW/407 hp in the speed range from 5,500 to 6,400 rpm, with maximum torque of 600 Newton-metres or 442 lb-ft all the way between 1,750 and 4,500 rpm.

The BMW 750i accelerates to 100 km/h in 5.2 seconds and is limited electronically to a top speed of 250 km/h or 155 mph. Average fuel consumption of the BMW 750i in the EU test cycle, already applying the EU 5 standard, is just 11.4 litres/100 kilometres or 24.8 mpg imp, with CO2 emissions of 266 grams per kilometre.

740i

The second petrol engine version of the new BMW 7 Series is powered by a straight-six with unmistakable performance characteristics again resulting from the combination of Twin Turbo technology and High Precision Injection. Appropriate modifi cations of the turbocharger system serve to increase output of the 3.0-litre power unit to 240 kW/326 hp.

Maximum engine power comes at 5,800 rpm, with maximum torque of 450 Newton-metres or 332 lb-ft from just 1,500 rpm. This helps the new BMW 740i to accelerate to 100 km/h in 5.9 seconds, with the car’s top speed limited electronically to 250 km/h or 155 mph.

Accordingly, average consumption in the EU test cycle is just 9.9 litres/100 kilometres or 28.5 mpg imp, with a CO2 rating of 232 grams per kilometre. Compared with its predecessor, the new BMW 740i thus offers 15 kW/20 hp more power on a reduction in fuel consumption by 12 per cent. And again, it almost goes without saying that the new BMW 740i complies in full with the EU 5 emission standard.

Transmission

Power is transmitted as standard on the new BMW 7 Series by a further enhanced six-speed automatic transmission with particularly sporting gearshift characteristics.

 



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