Make this make your fan

This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
Ariel

Ariel

United Kingdom United Kingdom (2001 - present)
close
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
close
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
contents:

History


add section
This feature requires you to be logged on autoviva

You can login to your account or create a new account.
History

James Staley and William Hillman established the first Ariel company in 1870, where they started out by producing Ariel-badged penny-farthing bicycles and sewing machines. They had invented the wire-spoke wheel and then they opened their factory to sell lighter-weight bicycles, naming them after the spirit of the air (Ariel). Not until 1896 would Ariel expand production to motorized vehicles.   Although Ariel eventually stood out because of their motorcycles, the British company has also been producing cars, tricycles, quadricycles, commercial and military vehicles throughout the past century. The company’s first ever vehicle was a 2.25 hp tricycle and it wasn’t until 1902 that Ariel released its first automobile, a 10 hp car. Ariel car production, however, was only active for two periods of time: between 1900 and 1915, and then from 1922 to 1925.   Charles Sangster’s company, Components Ltd., took over Ariel in 1902 and that is when Ariel motorcycles began being produced. The company, however, experienced some severe economic difficulties and, in 1907, Ariel’s Bournbrook, Birmingham factory was bought out by British engine manufacturer Lorraine-Dietrich. Ariel car assembly was then relocated to the Coventry Ordnance Works.   The event of World War I would take its toll on the company and, after the 1922–1925 period mentioned above, Ariel eventually gave up on car production. The company then increased its focus on the motorcycle markets, which explains why Ariel would become better known for this type of vehicles.   Ariel’s shareholder Components Ltd fell into bankruptcy in 1932 and, oddly enough, its owner’s own son, Jack Sangster, acquired subsidiary Ariel at a ridiculously low price from receivership. The company was thereafter rebaptized as Ariel Motors (J.S.) Ltd and in no time it was ready to resume production. Ariel was incorporated into the BSA Group in 1944. In the 1970’s, the company launched the last Ariel vehicle to be produced under Jack Sangster’s leadership, which was the 3-wheel 50cc Ariel 3.   The ‘Ariel’ name was resurrected in 1999 to revive the company as a sports car manufacturer, now under the official name Ariel Ltd.



back to toptop
close